Okay, now I had to go and do this pattern for my daughter!  This pattern is producing some pretty decent garments.  I have made 2 knit tops, 4 pair of pants, and 2 cardigans thus far.  The pattern is a quick pair of elastic waist pants from newlook 6735, the wardrobe pattern I used, again, to make mine and my moms pants.

With this project, these pants, I have come to hate sewing with ITY!  It is so unstable and totally unpredictable.  It has over 150%-200% stretch!!! What fits me, fits you, what fits her, fits them.  A store, or clothing line’s best kept secret so they don’t need to worry about making clothes that fit.  All that needs to be done is to sew it in a range of sizes and sell to everybody and you got a total market covered.  So, why don’t I like ITY?  I should be happy at how well they turned out for my child.  She, looks great, you say?  Why then, am I not happy?

Let’s start out explaining the obvious— construction details.  The hem was a perfect lattice edge finish.  Done on my serger, by way of suggestion from Carol of “G-CAS! Sew Excited!  when she taught a few things about finishing knits on periscope last month. I have seen this done on many garments, but never thought to use it as a hem on pants.  Needless to say, it works very well for this style palazzo pant.  The settings she gave me to get this look did not work for my machine.  So, it wouldn’t help for me to give you all the details for my machine, except to say, I used the #7 stitch and followed the directions in my manual.  If you want to do the same, you will need to make sure you have a rolled hem stitch and possibly change the differential feed and stitch length.  Basically, play around with the stitch until you get this look by “Really” stretching the fabric as you sew.

For the waistline finish on these pants and all my knit palazzo versions, I use a multi-stitched elastic finish.  I sew the elastic in first, then fold over the elastic and topstitch as I stretch.  It takes some getting used to since its sewn in the round.  If you want a video tutorial, just let me know in the comments. I cut a size 16 for this pattern and increased the back rise to cover the rear to the waist.  For the inseam, I extended the crotch an inch inside the back leg at the curve.  The pants were completely sewn on the serger.

Excessive Stretch!!!….caused me to hate ITY knits.  These pants were to be mine!!!  ALL MINE!!!  Until, I had my child come and help out as a fit model for a Fit-Friday LIVE!™ Online class that I host every Friday night.    My students voted the pants should be hers after they saw how well they fit her compared to me.  Aaaaggh…?!!  What???,,….. why did I use her as a model.  I loved the colors of these pants, I cut the pants for myself.  The measurement were meant for my hips, 44″, not her hips, 56″ inches.   At this point I remembered that when something stretches that much….it also means the “ease” is there for any size above your base measurement multiplied by the percentage and added to the original measurement to tell you that those are the sizes the garment will “stretch” to fit.  i.e..  44×150%=66″  That means that these pants will stretch UP TO 66″inches.  So, if you are 44″, 50″, 55″, 60″, or 66″, then these pants will fit you.  Cool right? Well, that’s cool for my child, but not for me.

You can judge for yourself…but I lost the battle of the pants when my students saw her modeling them in our class.  They listened to me explain all the details of crotch fitting and length changes and then chimed in on who looks better in these pants.  She won!!  (the exclamation points express how I really feel.  LOL.)

Looks to me like she has the expression on her face that says::::  “I WoN!!!”  Please tell me you don’t love yourself some ITY knit?  Tell me I’m not alone in my contempt for that fabric, please.

When I first heard the comment you are twinsies or that making the same garment or maybe using the same fabric made bloggers refer to each other as twinsies, I had no clue how making this little outfit for myself would lead to the adult version of the mommy and me ensemble.

I try and make something for mom as often as I can. She is always thinking about sewing and I am always sewing. Shucks, truth be told everybody in my family is always thinking about what I could make them. If I just had it in me, I would be sewing a new item for every one of my loved ones daily. I would be pushing out a couple new items each week. I wish I had the time and the inclination to do that. It’s just how much I love sewing for my family. However, since I don’t have that kind of time, I must limit what and for whom I sew. You already know, Moms are the wind beneath our wings. The breath that helps us rise to greater heights.

The pattern is a quick pair of elastic waist pants and the tops are two different view from the same newlook pattern. I started the pants the day before for myself and quickly realized that I needed a matching top.  I purchased this nylon/spandex sale fabric at JoAnns.

My neckline finish is from the view D cowl neck.
Newlook 6648- View A with C sleeves

The pants are both the wardrobe builders pattern newlook 6735.  The tops are newlook 6648, which is out of print, however, I’m sure you will find it if you want.  Mine is view D and moms is view A with view C butterfly sleeves.  I did a quick tutorial on how to make the “french bound” armhole and neckline treatment while I was sewing my top.  That video tutorial will be up later in another post and on my channel.  To be notified, just make sure you are also subscribed to my youtube channel.

More to come…..

Okay, can I just say….we copy off of each other everyday.  We see and sew, see and sew, whatever our friends sew.  Every time someone sews something we like, our list of things to sew grows and grows, and grows.  This was not something I was going to sew.  I hated these pants from the first day I saw them.  Even when I saw them on a fellow sew-sister, I thought to myself, she only looks good in them because she is 5 inches taller than me.  Well, that changed one night when I decided to take a chance at her insisting I “just try them”. 
Even while I was laying out the pattern, I was wondering was this a waste of my time….until I put them on and this happened…

It was photoshoot time.  I have all the backdrop and camera with tripod setup in my sewing room so I don’t need to run out chasing the sun.  I like to sew more than I like to take pictures, but you cannot tell by these shots.  I was having so much fun with my photographer and assistant- the remote control, and my granddaughter.   BTW….she told me to pose with the jeanie prayer hands.

Construction and Pattern Details:

Vogue 1355, a Sandra Betzina pattern has one piece for the pants.  The same as several McCalls patterns.  But Sandras patterns all have a special sizing that helps us to get near-ready-to-wear sizing. She uses a lettering system to create her sizes.  Her sizes do give good solid consideration for the tummy.
ALTERATIONS: I just the size D for length and didn’t pay attention to the hip or waist because I used my base pant sloper/block or TNT to check the fit before I cut the pattern.  I over-layed my pattern block on top of this pattern and lined up the grain-lines to make sure the crotch and the waist seams were what I needed.  As it turns out, as with every other pant pattern, I lowered the front waist by 1.5″ and extended the back crotch extension by at least an inch and shortened the front crotch extension by the same amount.  
If you need a pair of absolutely quick and fun pair of pants to wear, this is the one.  Listen to a friend, in my case, Cennetta of The Mahogany Stylist, they won’t lead you astray.  At first I thought that extra fabric hanging between my legs would drive me crazy, but I haven’t really felt it.  Ohhh!!!  I have worn then these pants way too much.  So, I guess that means I need to hurry and make another pair really soon.
FABRIC:  
I used the lightest of weight rayon jersey from JoAnns, I had bought planning to make some polazzo pants a year ago.  These work just fine.  
RECOMMEND?? Absolutely!!
I love palazzo pants just as much as I love maxi skirts.  Jeans are not on my radar during the Houston summers.  Only dresses and shorts are my summer attire…but occasionally, when I really want to relax modestly and still feel dressed up enough to go out in this heat, lightweight pants are great.  In this case, the palazzo pants do the trick.  
There are so many different patterns on the market for palazzos, but these sort of went under the radar for such a long long time.  As a matter of fact, the envelope even screams “boring.”  I spend more time opening pattern envelopes and reading and studying pattern pieces, than I care to admit.  I just want to see how they are designed, because that is my nature, never take anything at face value, and always look under the hood.

I always knew making leggings were easy to sew up and finish quickly.  So what does these palazzo pants have in common with a pair of leggings?–  They do not have a side seam, and there is only one pattern piece!  Gotta love simplicity, right?  This McCall’s 6571 is a hidden gem, but not the first of its kind.  After a little research, I found another pattern from the same company “McCall’s Pattern Company”, a Vogue 2064, a really nice tunic and “wide leg” pant pattern.  They can be done up in a knit or woven fabric.  Both need to be light draped fabrics though.  The pattern made for woven fabrics come with extra darts for shaping the hips and waist, and includes an invisible zipper.  The knit pattern piece has darts on the side only at the waist for that final tweaking of the waist shaping, along with an elastic waistband.

I made them extra long and added a 2.5″ topstitched hem for the look to balance out the stripes.  The pattern is listed as a Palmer/Pletsch pattern because of the helpful adjustment lines available to assist with making fitting alterations.  These fitting lines help you to make size and fitting changes in areas common for most people when using commercial patterns.  Mainly, these adjustments include crotch changes and lengthen or shorten lines.  The width is done down the side seam in most pants, but in this pattern, you would just increase the back crotch width or the front accordingly.  

I like this pattern because, it is balanced enough to allow for stripes to remain horizontal with no skewing like what happens with regular leggings.  This is because the inseam (inside leg seam) is straightened, thus causes the pant leg to hang straight on the grain.  


Pattern Details:  
  • Cut size 16 with a waist size 14.
  • lengthened 3 inches to achieve the large hem
  • I used a 1.5″ flat elastic, and installed it like a sportswear waistband with 3 rows of stitching

Fabric Details:  A nice beefy cotton jersey knit purchased in New York.  (New Yorkers are so lucky.)  This fabric has a 32″ repeat…why do I do that to myself!??  The matching striped was begging to be purchased at the same time, although I just can’t seem to pull together a good look for it just yet.  I tried a making top from the small stripe, but it just did not work.  My instagram friends said, it works for two separate looks, but not together. 

Blouse:  I originally made this blouse (The Graffiti Wrap Top) from the 01/2008 Burda Style magazine here.  I just decided not to place the sleeves on this version, and folded over the sleeve opening’s and stitched using a zigzag.  I can see the underlay pulls at the armhole giving it a really cute angle detail at the armhole.  Later I will try and figure out the problem, but for now, I kinda like the look.   I used a matte jersey to make the top, its really nice and cool even in this weather.

All-in-all, I am working on so many different looks right now…so getting back to another top from the same pattern within months of each other must mean I really must like it.  As for the pants, I will be pulling together another pair to wear with a cute tunic I’m working on currently.

Well, hello all, today I come to you with two new pattern playmates.  We have the Katherine Pants, from StyleArc Patterns, sharing the spotlight with a true success!!!. a shirt from the Vogue 8747 patterns, which may very well become one of my favorite button downs.

 
I don’t know about you, but I like to eat my dessert before my dinner…just in case I get too full, at least I had the good stuff first.  Thus, it is with this post…I will give you the gist on the top first.
mardi gras colors

Vogue 8747 top view D:
I call this my Mardi Gras blouse, because a friend told me, after I showed here this fabric; “Oh, those are Mardi Gras colors!  How exciting.”  I had no clue.  I bought that fabric last year, and was just drawn to the beautiful watery movement of buildings nearly hidden in the print. I’m embarrassed to say just how much per yard I paid, so if you don’t know, then you are like I was, “Clueless”.  For those of you who do know about “Liberty of London”, can I join your club?  OOOOwee!! this stuff feels fine!!

It’s made from some of the best cotton I have ever sewn, REALLY!!  I will shout that one from the roof top.  I did not know that “Liberty of London” was so special.  I do say that stuff is expensive!!  Yes, I did use all caps, and several exclamation points…that is how I feel.    Shoutout to Josephine’s Dry Goods in Portland, OR(non-sponsored)  Because, they had a boatload of the stuff and the finery was to die for and go to sewing heaven.  

It takes time to “build” a wardrobe of lovelies, those pieces you will pick up and wear over and over again.  That is why it took so long.  This fabric was destined to become a button down the moment I lay eyes on it, but I still had to find the buttons.  Not just any button would have worked.  There again, they just floated into my life whilst shopping for a client I came upon these gems of the ocean to be added to this sea of buildings.  Feast your eyes, oooh my goodness is that not delicious or what?  That was my dessert.   YumYum, that smile is from the internal satisfaction I get wearing this shirt.

Shortening the front band from apex to neck ensures modesty at the decollate’ for the over 40″ crowd.
Construction notes for the top:  
The pattern has multiple views to choose from, a regular with the Vogue basics line of patterns, a true bargain when you are spending big bucks for the material.   The pattern represents the hem as having a shirt-tail shape, but I don’t see it.  It isn’t as pronounced as I would have liked to have in the back.  I will take care of that in the next top.  There will be another, and another, and another.  (I’ll keep going and going and …..as with “Peewee Herman”)
  • NO FBA!!!  Yeepee!  I cut a size 14 as usual, but this pattern had the A-D cup bust sizing.  I used the D cup. (Actually, I think its a little too roomy in the bust, but it may be the design of the gathers along the front placket) 
  • I Shortened the center front between apex and the neck.  You see the little wedge along the front under the neckline.  That wedge is magic for the over 40″ crowd. (Meaning over a B’cup)

  • A swayback adjustment was taken as usual. (See piece 10 above…)  
  • Also added a 1/2″ broad back adjustment. 
  • Totally straightened the center back.  Vogue seems to always add a bit of a curve to all their princess backs, which isn’t something I need.
  • I did not lengthen the top this time, but I intend to do so on the next go around.
  • Lowered the back neck by 3/8″ 
  • You won’t see in the alterations, is that I added 1.5″ to the hips graded from the waist to the hem.  (I will add those changes to the pattern before I mount it to tagboard.)

StyleArc Katherine Pants:

First off, these are indeed tailored pants.  Another wardrobe staple for me aside from the button down.

stretch woven wool.


To be honest with you, this review has been in the making for quite some time, while I tried to decide how to present all the information to you.  I don’t want to burden your blog reader with too much information at one time.  So, I need you to tell me the format in which you want me to dissect these pants.   I only found ONE (1), yes, one pattern review on these pants.  I also contacted the designer for construction assistance with the pockets.

The fabric is a fine light stretch tropical wool…which in and of itself gave me headaches when I tried to topstitch the center front crease seam.  It is a great fabric, but I think I might have a slight sensitivity to wool, because it really makes me itch when and sneeze to wear it or sew with it.  I equate this fabric to a high-end bengaline, because it has a cross grain stretch which resulted in my laying the patterns on the cross not the along the selvage.  I wanted the stretch to go “around” my body, I was thinking if I left it go up and down, then I would get saggy bottom.

topstitching on the bernina 780 using tropical wool stretch

Fitting notes:  “Balance in worklife and personal life is everything.”  But what about “Pattern Balance” in your sewing?

In order to keep them straight and balanced at the center front where the seam is on the actual crease, I had to remember to make any width adjustments on both sides of the leg, inseam and out-seam, at the center leg seam…but I forgot just near the end, when I decided to add just a smidgen more right before I cut.  (((((WRONG MOVE….))))

The legs are 20 inches at the hem, not to be confused with the “slim” 15″ leg of the barb pant I made here.  They should hang straight down from the side hip, and the crease “should” be in the center of the leg.   Because of this it’s important to keep the balance of the pattern when making adjustments. Most fitting guides tell you to increase at the sides. That’s doesn’t work.

An unbalanced worklife.

Come on my fellow pattern nerds, what have we resorted to with this fitting craze?  I have decided to wear these damn pants, no matter what the fit police say.  Posting my butt all over the internets, for the advancement of the sewing sciences, proves I love my rear end in all its round glory.

I know, I know….“Andrea, of all people, you teach fit!! “You have blah, blah, blah..training, blah, blah, duh.”  So, what are you talking about, you should have ALL the answers.”   But wait…. I say, Fitting is a moving target, YO!! and at each junction you decide what part of it you are willing to forgo for the current fashion item you choose to construct.

This is especially true if you insist on making different garments from a different pattern and different fabric with every project.  At some point, I just want to say, “enough is enough!”

Thus, for me I have decided, in my own infinite wisdom, to forgo new pant patterns and just design around my sloper ONLY.  At least for a while, ha!  Right, we will see how long that last.  To get me focused, I signed up for Kathy Ruddy’s Craftsy class ” One Pattern Many Looks” when they had their last sale.

The side front of StyleArc Katherine woven pant….notice the grain line, it would only prove why the pants tend to twist on the leg.  It seams this should be changed to line up with the body, and not be left the same after the alterations.  

Please stay tuned for the next installment of this post giving you the full blown internal guts and gores of the pattern workings, the pocket making and the fitting of Miss Katherine.   Its deep yawl.

….until then, keep studying your patterns.
Andrea

Meet Barb, a StyleArc pattern, a yoga pant type, basically, a comfort pant. I have had a few problems fitting these and other StyleArc pants on my figure. You will see a few more in post to follow, since I need to get more pics of the pattern alterations. For now I wanted you to know about these.

They have a simple elastic waistband. The way the waistband is installed, actually, saves bulk at the waist and keeps the area flat. You use a 1.5-2″ elastic, sewn on the flat band and then folded before attaching it to the pants.

The problem I have had with accepting the StyleArc RTW concept is this– “If Ready-To-wear does not fit me, then why would I want to deal with a pattern that purports RTW?” It doesn’t seem to make much sense to struggle so much with a pair of pants that pose all the same fitting issues I deal with in RTW.

The following are the long list of challenges that plague me with RTW, as well as have shown to crossover into the StyleArc pants patterns: I cut a size 16.

1. Back rise had to be raised by 1.5 inches
2. Front crotch had to be lowered 1.5 inches
3. Crotch extension in the back was extended by 1/2 inch
4. Removed over 1 inch excess crotch extension from front
5. Took out 5 inches (yes, five) from the waist
6. Deepened the back crotch by 3/8 inch.

Mind you this was a basic pair of stretch pants. Considering the simplicity of the pattern, this was a lot of alterations. Oh, and yes, I did follow my sloper to determine some of these changes. Although, I think part of the problem falls with the skew of the grain-line in these pants. The pattern has the grain almost straight along the side seam causing the inseam to be on a more pronounced bias than that which my sloper is based.

I used a patterned Ponte Roma knit from my stash. This is a very stable knit with excellent recovery. It has the handle and weight of a Sofia Ponte knit.

Because I did so many modifications, I almost lost interest in this make, but, didn’t want to waste the good fabric by throwing them into a pile. So I pressed on to get them done despite my frustrations. With that, I have now decided these will be my quick makes for comfort pants.  They really sewed up pretty quick, aside from the alterations, it took me less than an hour, mostly done on the serger, including adding the waistband.

Everyone should have a basic pair of comfort pants to sew up anytime. Do you have recommendations for other great Comfort pants patterns to try, that you have perfected? I would love to try others.

as always, thanks….Andrea

If you want a new take on the boring leggings…these pants would be them.  I’m always looking to get a cute design detail, something out of the norm.  
StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock

The fabric was this new stuff that has been showing up all over the place, “Bengaline” sold by StyleArc, JoAnns and also Hancock.  I got mine at Hancock.  It really is extremely stretchy.  Not easy to topstitch if you go across the “grain” or across the direction of the stretch.

Texans Fan wearing StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock

This fabric is so new to me.  It takes some getting used to, in order to stable on the different cross seams and topstitching.  I’m really not too fond of it right now.  But, we shall see.  I got a little more for some other projects.

Texans Fan wearing StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock

I know you couldn’t wait to see the back!!!  That is the main reason we read about peoples pants post..to see if the butt fits.  LOL…yes, me too, I have no shame.

Texans Fan wearing StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock
I cut the size 16, but the waist again, as has been with the last 3 pair of stylearc, had to be taken up by 6 inches.  These things are drafted for juniors or something, to have the waist measurement so close to the hip measurement.  I don’t understand.  
Texans Fan wearing StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock

The pattern is your basic leggings, but cut with the front and back which has the side seam…not the quick version.  The knee is sewn with a couple pleats on the outer and inner seam to give it the padded look.  I had to sew out most of the ease.  However, I could do too much, I had to leave the pants slightly loose, otherwise, I would not be able to walk because of the cross seaming over the legs and knees.

Texans Fan wearing StyleArc cassie pants by www.sewtofit.com using bengaline fabric from Hancock

I may make them again after a tad bit more tweaking in the legs.  The back leg seam cuts into my leg, and the calf section is too tight.

These are my entry for the Pattern Review “Fitted Pant Contest” that ends on June 9th.  I have been wanting a pair of crop pants for quite sometime now, so this was a perfect time to force me to make a pair.  Entering a contest is not something I normally do, however, after meeting so many fantastic ladies at the PR Weekend in Austin at the start of May, I couldn’t resist participating. 

Sewtofit- Butterick 5895

I used the Butterick 5895 pattern.
Pattern Description:

Fitted cotton crop pants with high waist and tapered to hem.  Has optional roll-up hem. Back zipper, side front pockets and hook closure.

Pattern Sizing:
I cut a size 16 and graded the waist to a 14. 
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?Yes, actually it did.

Sewtofit- Butterick 5895

Were the instructions easy to follow?
Extremely easy.  I only checked the instructions to make sure I didn’t miss anything.  I chose not to topstitch the crotch seam.  I hemmed 1 inch instead of 5/8. 
What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?The front rise is extremely “High.”  I know I usually have to lower mine on all patterns, but I think since this one is considered high waist, then it was over 2.5″ too much for me.  My front crotch is 8.5″ navel to crotch curve.

Sewtofit- Butterick 5895

Fabric Used: Cotton, with 15% stretch only, I think that is too generous.  When I tested the stretch factor is stretched 1″ pass the 4″ test length.  Thus, I am not considering this a stretch woven.

These alterations were completed on Butterick 5895


Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: I kept the design pretty much the same.  However, these are my changes:
Front Crotch- lowered by 2.5″
Back crotch- did not have to increase like normal, the back was already pretty high for my build.
Back waist: lowered it by 1/2″
Front/back thigh: increased the front over the upper thigh by 1″ to straighten the side seam, thereby, removing said amount from the back pattern piece.
Pocket opening: trimmed 1/4″ from the front pocket top in order to shorten it so that it wouldn’t fold out.
Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I will be making another pair in a solid color.
Conclusion:
I don’t know why they called these jeans on the pattern description, they are not jeans.  Other than that, this would make a great basic pattern from which to create any type of crop pants.

Sewing for me, is extremely fun.  Patterns and patternmaking is intriguing and challenging at the same time.  I do it because I like to challenge myself, and because there is “always” something new to learn.  However, every time I think about making a pair of pants, I want instant success.  I usually avoid making pants because I don’t want to redraft or go through endless pattern alterations.  Thus, as with anything else I would rather have two, or three, or even four if it means less stress.  Shucks the way I am, I may start wearing a “personal style uniform” as discussed  here (uniform dressing)

This is why I think it important to have that one pattern for every style of clothing, that you wouldn’t mind using over and over again.

After loosing weight you would think that all the pattern alterations would have to begin anew if using the same pattern. Well that is not the case with these pants from burda..at least for me. I have found that we usually gain and loose weight over a basic body composition. Meaning that if I gain weight I gain it proportionately. (1″ at the waist, then 1″ at the hip.). The things that changes on me are always proportionate, so when I lost weight I decided to make these pants again using a smaller pattern size.





Pattern Description:
Wide leg pants that are close fitting through the hips.
Pattern Sizing:
34-44, us- 8-18. See my blog entry– “Making the Grade” a matter of size. for the size differences with the Burda Patterns compared to the “big four” pattern companies.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

They do tend to flare out at the hem, I know it’s because this time I used a stiffer linen fabric…the original was a linen blend.


Pattern Review for first pair.

I am really short in the front and the panel tends to crumple down…As it is designed it is two interfaced pieces, sewn together like a pocket and turn right side out through the bottom, then edge stitched. Afterwards, the buttonholes are sewed on before applying to the pants front by sewing only on the bottom and buttoned up the sides. The buttons and holes are still loose.


Were the instructions easy to follow?
Since I have made these before, I did not use the instructions, however, I still reiterate if you are a beginner it does take some getting used to to follow Burdas style of instruction. Just take it slow, read all before starting.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
The crotch curve is absolutely magnificent! I only did a 1″ rise increase in the back, I was able to leave the curve alone. Normally, I have to extend it to go under the rump roast I carry in the back. They hang wonderfully. I don’t have any dislikes for this pattern. I like the fact that the lap zipper is on the side. (finally, a side zip) I like that the panel can be removed from the front and just show the buttons. There is no functioning zipper opening behind the front panel, so its really just a design detail.
  

Fabric Used:
I used a Linen. I knew it would have some wrinkling but I was ok with that….I choose not to line the pants as a result. The pattern doesn’t require lining, but I know some people like to line linen to help with wrinkling.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
As I said earlier, I increased the back crotch rise by 1″. I lowered the front by 1 1/2″, this adjustments makes the pattern look really malformed, but it is my body. The gradual decline starts at the side seam, you can’t even tell when they are on the body, the waist actually appears normal….do your adjust and ignore how the pattern “looks”.



I left the hem the same from the original pattern, so that they would work better without heels. The regular length would be just fine for the average 5’5″ person such as myself.
Everytime I think about making pants, I want instant success.  I don’t usually make them because I don’t want to redraft or go through endless pattern alterations.  Thus, as with anything else I would rather have two, or three, or even four if it means less stress.  Shucks the way I am, I may start wearing a “personal style uniform” as discussed  here (uniform dressing)


Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I would definitely sew these again. This pattern has a lapped zipper on the side, I will make with with an invisible zipper next time.

Conclusion: for those who have seen my ordinal post, I encourage to check it out, there is a cute video that will give you a great laugh.Original review



Finding Pattern Review.com has been so much fun. Knowing there are so many others in the world who want to know how I did with a pattern is exhilerating. It encourages me to complete my projects and try new ones. Taking all the pictures is fun too, yet can cause the family to run everytime you pull out the camera.  But, lucky, my fashionista daugther loves to see the pics come out nice.  So, on her visit she treated me to a fun photoshoot and actually made me accessorize the outfit….Enjoy!
Project Description:
Burda 8488- Wide leg pants that are close fitting through the hips.
Pattern Sizing:
34-44, us- 8-18. See my blog entry– Making the “Grade” a matter of size. for the size differences with the Burda Patterns compared to the “big four” pattern companies.
Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
These pants are totally awesome. I saw a Tracey Reese Resort Wear pair that I just fell in love with. This pair, after lengthening them 2 inches, foot the bill totally. They are really long from the envelope.
The front panel as it is designed it is two interfaced pieces, sewn together like a pocket and turned right side out through the bottom, then edge stitched. Afterwards, the buttonholes are sewed on before applying to the pants front by sewing only on the bottom and buttoned up the sides. I ended up sewing it across the top and shortening it by another inch to where it as a mock panel just to get the look. The buttons and holes are still loose.

Were the instructions easy to follow?
The instructions were very clear, as I am a visual learner, actually seeing the layouts and step-by-step instructions are great for me. I layout the garment pieces exactly the way the pattern says. The pics line up with the instruction numbers just great. That is really a plus for beginning sewist. I usually don’t follow instructions, but when they are this easy to follow it really helps to stay on task. Something, my sidetracked mindset needs.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

The crotch curve is absolutely magnificent! I only did a 1″ rise increase in the back, I was able to leave the curve alone. Normally, I have to extend it to go under the rump roast I carry in the back. They hang wonderfully. I don’t have any dislikes for this pattern. I like the fact that the lap zipper is on the side. (finally, a side zip) I like that the panel can be removed from the front and just show the buttons. There is no functioning zipper opening behind the front panel, so its really just a design detail.

Fabric Used:
I dyed a piece of white linen blend I bought from Joann’s last summer. I had dyed it then during a class, but ended up removing the color with Ritz Color Remover, it left the fabric a grayish tint. I wanted the color to look worn and rustic…I think I achieved the look I was after.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

As I said earlier, I increased the back crotch rise by 1″. I lowered the front by 1/2″, and I added 2″ to the hem. The regular length would be just fine for the average 5’5″ person such as myself.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I would definitely sew these again, next time I will actually put the patch pockets on them just like the Tracey Reese inspiration pair.

Conclusion:
Wide leg pants look great on me. I’m so glad they are back in vogue.
My daughter, the fashionista, insisted I do better at my photo uploads. So she made me change shirts, put on jewelry and heels and get a purse to go outside for a real photo shoot! Enjoy…