When I first heard the comment you are twinsies or that making the same garment or maybe using the same fabric made bloggers refer to each other as twinsies, I had no clue how making this little outfit for myself would lead to the adult version of the mommy and me ensemble.

I try and make something for mom as often as I can. She is always thinking about sewing and I am always sewing. Shucks, truth be told everybody in my family is always thinking about what I could make them. If I just had it in me, I would be sewing a new item for every one of my loved ones daily. I would be pushing out a couple new items each week. I wish I had the time and the inclination to do that. It’s just how much I love sewing for my family. However, since I don’t have that kind of time, I must limit what and for whom I sew. You already know, Moms are the wind beneath our wings. The breath that helps us rise to greater heights.

The pattern is a quick pair of elastic waist pants and the tops are two different view from the same newlook pattern. I started the pants the day before for myself and quickly realized that I needed a matching top.  I purchased this nylon/spandex sale fabric at JoAnns.

My neckline finish is from the view D cowl neck.
Newlook 6648- View A with C sleeves

The pants are both the wardrobe builders pattern newlook 6735.  The tops are newlook 6648, which is out of print, however, I’m sure you will find it if you want.  Mine is view D and moms is view A with view C butterfly sleeves.  I did a quick tutorial on how to make the “french bound” armhole and neckline treatment while I was sewing my top.  That video tutorial will be up later in another post and on my channel.  To be notified, just make sure you are also subscribed to my youtube channel.

More to come…..

Last year I went back to the basics. With the help of a wardrobe consultant, I have been steadily trying to make basic garments to go along with the fun flashy mood enhancing outfits I am prone to focus on regularly.  She insisted I make a basic white shirt, here.  I followed along, rather defiantly, but I did what I was told.  I had no idea that the basic white shirt would become one that I would reach for more often than not.  However, my inner child couldn’t be held back for much longer, I had to “turn it up” a notch so to speak.  Thus, I bring to you my version of the basic white button down shirt!!!!  Tadah!!!

It is so much fun when you can create exactly what you want and have it work out the first time around.  This is particularly so because I had already gone through the process of fitting and tweaking my basic sloper for the “darted” front bodice some time ago.  So all I had to do was make the changes to the basic shirt pattern as needed to make this one.  I had a few design elements in mind that I knew I wanted, including that elastic sleeve detail.  I just love it.

I kept the upper band flat and just kept the 1″ elastic in the area of the sleeve to keep it flat over the bust and at the back.  This small detail made all the difference for me.  

Another very important detail that made the difference for this being an “off-the-shoulder”, was the need for a different type of dart.  I made the regular side bust dart into a “french” dart so that it would not appear like a lone line floating in a sea of clouds.  It also elongated the torso.  Another win.  Also, I just had to have the regular “men’s” shirt pleat in the back in order to give it that oversized look.  Since I have fallen in love with my new “boyfriend” jeans, I now wanted to have a “boyfriend” shirt.  So, I made sure I exaggerated the length of the bodice and the sleeves.
The sleeve cuffs are really regular double button oversized as well so they hang over my thumb just a little to make it look too big but not slouchy.  The buttons were a gift from a customer, which made the outfit.  It really is amazing how easy it is for people to understand your style just by the clothes you wear. 

And to think, I didn’t want to wear an “off-the-shoulder” because I don’t like the idea of adding any extra to my chest area.  This flat band treatment really made all the difference.  The pants are my Style Arc Cassie pants from last year I think.

Construction Details:

  • Pattern- self drafted

  • Pattern Details:
    • Rotate side dart to french dart
    • disregard waist darts so as to keep all amount of fullness 
    • lengthen bodice front and back by 2 inches
    • lengthen sleeve 2 inches
    • slash and spread sleeve cap to add fullness at top only all the way to cuff
    • measure and cut top of shoulder and sleeve away.
Have you taken the time to make sure you have a basic pattern that you can work from when you find that special outfit or garment inspiration?

I have searched and searched for the perfect Henley pattern for years now. I finally came across this one by way of my January Stitch Fix. It was so right I had to duplicate it for future use. I did make an attempt at drafting one before, but I couldn’t figure out what fine detail was missing until now. So I went back to the drawing board and self-drafted this tee with the same details that caught my attention in the Stitch Fix version. Now I know, it was the neckline shaping!!

Grey henley t-shirt with sleeve bands and button placket.

So many fine details make up the perfect wardrobe piece. It’s a wonder I don’t have ten of these by now. I made it about two weeks ago, maybe three. I don’t even remember. What I do remember is that I have worn it so many times that one things for sure, is that I better hurry and find some more fabric and get a few more completed, before my family calls the fashion police.

 
Of course there was only a few tweaks I had to make for it to fit me the way I like, and that was the arm circumference. The fabric for future makes need to be very lightweight and breezy for it to feel comfy.  It’s really no secret, I’m a button-down and t-shirt kinda gal.  So if I can get it to feel that comfortable, then it will be in heavy rotation in my closet, which is why I needed help for ideas on styling beyond the regular “t-shirt” wear.

For this one, I made the sleeve tabs faux, but next time I will go ahead and put actual buttonholes in them. The main reason for that is I keep trying to unbutton them and lower the sleeves. The button placket is fully functional, just as I wanted with a narrow lightly interfaced band. I am really very happy with the make, I even allowed my daughter to style me up, since I’m prone to just throw this very comfortable top on for any relaxed occasion. I needed her to give me pointers on taking a simple wardrobe piece to another level and jazz it up. I chose the shoes myself, the boyfriend jeans are something I have fallen head over heels for as well. They too are another Stitch Fix find. Total score!! I’m rocking her hat too. I wore it when I visited NYC last year. I do love to wear hats, problem is it is hard to find the right size for my noggins.

I get a kick out of understanding the history and meaning or background for the things I wear or what I do.  For this, I wanted to check out where or what “henley” really is, and this is what I found….
  • The men’s henley is a “collarless” version of a polo shirt with three “signature” buttons.
  • The top button is never buttoned closed… hence the women’s version is a little more sexy with the top opened down to resemble a v-neck
  • It is usually long sleeve and may be worn as a base layer to a jacket.

Here is a video of the original Stitch Fix fashion show where i show you their version.

Rodeo season is upon us and hats are a big thing in these parts. What say ye about hats? Do you wear the big ones are keep to the more conservative type?

Yellow is such a wonderful boost to my overall state of mind.  The light was dim, but the top was the sun.  I needed something quick to sew to get me over this hump with all the other fitting work and projects I have been working on.  This was a really quick top to make….actually it was all of 1 hour, and that was because I had problems with the stitching because I was too lazy to actually change the needle to a “stretch” needle.  Of course I know better, since I did write a tutorial on sewing on knits…here…go figure.  “Do as I say, not as I do, right?”  OOOps.

The wind of course was giving me a task of this small little photo shoot.  I just pulled over to the side of the rode, set my tripod and let her rip while I talked on the phone to my fellow sew-sister, and friend, WendyByDesign from Detroit, via FaceTime of course.  That made the whole deal more fun, since I do become somewhat shy about taking pictures in public…you gotta believe me, I am really coming out of my shell for y’all.
The folks looking out the office window really were have a time with my escapades.  I have so much appreciation for those bloggers that get out for their pictures time and time again.  Well that for them and this is for me…I hate this type of thing.  But, like I said it was a lot of fun.  

 This is the second time making this pattern, the first time was here without the sleeve.  The fabric was a nice gift from another sew-sister, Cennetta at The Mahogany Stylist.  It’s really nice meeting such wonderful people all over the country and world.  I don’t particularly have any folks in different countries yet to call on, but it in the works.

The pattern is literally shaped the exact way it looks.  I did a small fba on the front left “bust” so it wouldn’t pull to the side like in the last one.  Amazing how much of a difference it makes.
I will definitely be making this again.  I am head over heals with this “t-shirt” top.  
Thanks for reading. 

No fancy, dressed up pictures here today.  Just a relaxed day, showing just how much rest I need right now.  I made this new top for sitting in the breeze and enjoying the fresh air from the back porch.  Gauze and relaxation, for me, go hand and hand anytime of year.  It’s an oversized, comfy top.

I knew I wanted blue as my base embroidery color.  This color just feels cool and calming.  The bright creamy white of the cotton gauze is comfortable in the summer heat and protects you from he sun rays when out and about.

Being such a casual look and yet so stylish, it makes easy fun when you want to have a roomy uninhibited outfit.  Yes, I do wear oversized clothes.

Contruction Details:

Initially, I had the facing piece as a larger underlay to help highlight the embroidery, but it just didn’t look right.  Also, because I tore the stabilizer, I ended up with a hole in the front which needed to be camouflaged.  This is some really thin fabric.  Extremely comfortable.

When I tried taking out the larger facing section, I created a tad bit of a tear…the fabric is almost cheesecloth gauze.  One thing after the other right….oh well.  I did persevere to get the look I wanted.  All the flower embroidery designs were standard on my machine…the BERNINA 780, which I have on loan.  The decorative stitching was done on my personal machine the BERNINA 640, which I bought myself.  If really was an afterthought that I added while out of town.  I carry my B640 on trips to the vacation condo whenever I leave town.

 Anyway, after cutting the facing down, and re-sewing it to the smaller one, it gave a much nicer and cleaner look to the front, that actually highlighted the embroidery a little more than I had anticipated.

This was my first time doing embroidery on such an extremely gauzy sheer fabric.  I learned a few tips along the way….
  1. Use a good self adhesive tearaway- wash away stabilizer in the area to be embroidered.
  2. hoop the stabilizer only, not the garment piece because it may stretch the gauze 
  3. gently adhere the fabric piece over the stabilizer securely
  4. when done, do not wash the stabilizer out until you are complete finished sewing the garment (This I learned the hard way….because the fabric became very difficult to handle, and can cause tears.)
  5. Use the gold embroidery needles, they have a coating that doesn’t stick to the adhesive.

Pattern Details:  

Simplicity 1162 was used as my base pattern with the change in the facing only.  Simple and too the point.  I cut a size 14 and did not make any pattern alterations.

 Simplicity 1162- pattern
I have worn this several times already, I did not want the sleeves to have any elastic.  I may go back and add some shirring at the middle of the sleeves though, so it won’t get caught in anything.
BTW…Don’t forget to check out my YouTube videos on fitting shirts this month.  My IRL (in real life) sewing group is still working on the Iconic White Shirt.  
So my videos will help you work out fit issues for the different body types.    This is the playlist for the videos.
Last week was the Petite, RECTANGLE: with Balanced on top and bottom, but boxy, with little or no waist definition. body type.  And this week will be the THE TRIANGLE: Small bust and/or narrow shoulders with full tummy, hips, or thighs. 

Until next time….thanks for following along.

What do lobster claws, split rings and jump rings have to do with sewing.  When jewelry making and sewing meet head to head, a person like me is open to whatever comes out of the meeting.  I don’t mind learning new things and getting really great ideas to make my handmades look extra special with that little detail that causes it to stand apart in my closet.  Besides, I enjoy DIY in every form, when the mood strikes.  I’m feeling mighty accomplished because I took the time to learn a little something about jewelry making and how to apply it to garment making.  I know full well I’m not the first to add a little extra, but this is really kinda cool.  A little tedious, but all the same–cool.


TaaDaaa!!  ahem…I’m happy.  Jewelry supplies and findings may become another storage bin in my sewing cave for an additional creative outlet, when the mood arises.  Until then, jeweled additions to my sewing arsenal may become a regular occurrence.  The top was simple enough to finish in three – four hours because of the fine sewing needed to finish all the hemming and straps.  

Adding the jewelry took it to the next level, and I am glad I made the effort.  This was a learning curve.  First, I didn’t know that every little piece of the necklace was a different purchase.  What are jump rings, lobster claws, cable chains, and split rings used for.  I ended up going back and forth to the Joanns Fabric and crafts three to four times.  No one at the store knew what to tell me, so of course, I had to go to the trusty YouTube university to learn a little jewelry making 101.  My hats off to the wonderful folks who take the time to serve up a little advice and direction for trying new things.  I consider all YouTube videos an introduction to skills before I go to a college course and layout my money, only to discover it isn’t something I like to do.  I’ll dabble in YouTube videos all day.

Pattern Review:  Simplicity 1424 with several views.   Let us say…straight off the bat, I love love love this top!!!  So much so, that I need to hurry and make another version before I ruin this one with snags and makeup stains.  It is not silk, too bad.  I was desperate to find this color to go with my palazzo pants, but couldn’t decide on any other top than this one.  The fabric just cried out to be this blouse.  Lots of back interest, both mine and the blouse.  Great for daytime summer fun, or a great date with the mate.

The front has an overlay for you to add extra layers for modesty of the girls and to coverup and camouflage the “unmentionables.”  But I dare mention the “un-mentionables!!!  Adhesive Bras, bust lifts and the like are the thing for swanky tops, dresses and blouses, these days.  I love them, OMG, did I say I love them.  Yes, I did!!!  Anyhoo, moving on to the topic at hand.  No more avoiding certain styles because you don’t have options for coverage.  Check out what is out there.
The back has the cowl neck finish which could use a weight added to the center to help hold it down, if you use a light flowing fabric.  It falls really low!!!  My pants are high-waisted, it doesn’t get to the top of the pants because I pulled up the strap.  But, keep that in mind when you decide to make this.
The hem length is really long in the back and has adjustable strap rings that connect the cross strap as well as the shoulder straps together in one.  This helped, at least for me to pull up the under arm as well as the front to the height you want, and you can change it later for more room.  
Alterations:  My changes to the pattern were very minimum with this top.  I used the size 14 with a 3/4″ FBA using the pivot and slide method.  (I suggest if you want to know something about the pivot and slide method, to start with Nancy Zeiman…she is the originator of the technique, anyone else, may very well be watering it down.  I figure, learn from the best to understand the rest.) I usually use this technique when I need to make a very small change without lengthening the front.
Instructions:  Pretty straight forward.  The confusing part was threading the straps and sewing them down around the rings.  On the front I chose to leave off the strap across the chest. (it looked dorky).
Simplicity 1424
As always, thanks for visiting my slice of the world wide web.  Anytime you have any questions please let me know by emailing me or hitting me up on Instagram or twitter.  Also, most of my reviews are placed on the Pattern Review website in much more detail. 

 

I love palazzo pants just as much as I love maxi skirts.  Jeans are not on my radar during the Houston summers.  Only dresses and shorts are my summer attire…but occasionally, when I really want to relax modestly and still feel dressed up enough to go out in this heat, lightweight pants are great.  In this case, the palazzo pants do the trick.  
There are so many different patterns on the market for palazzos, but these sort of went under the radar for such a long long time.  As a matter of fact, the envelope even screams “boring.”  I spend more time opening pattern envelopes and reading and studying pattern pieces, than I care to admit.  I just want to see how they are designed, because that is my nature, never take anything at face value, and always look under the hood.

I always knew making leggings were easy to sew up and finish quickly.  So what does these palazzo pants have in common with a pair of leggings?–  They do not have a side seam, and there is only one pattern piece!  Gotta love simplicity, right?  This McCall’s 6571 is a hidden gem, but not the first of its kind.  After a little research, I found another pattern from the same company “McCall’s Pattern Company”, a Vogue 2064, a really nice tunic and “wide leg” pant pattern.  They can be done up in a knit or woven fabric.  Both need to be light draped fabrics though.  The pattern made for woven fabrics come with extra darts for shaping the hips and waist, and includes an invisible zipper.  The knit pattern piece has darts on the side only at the waist for that final tweaking of the waist shaping, along with an elastic waistband.

I made them extra long and added a 2.5″ topstitched hem for the look to balance out the stripes.  The pattern is listed as a Palmer/Pletsch pattern because of the helpful adjustment lines available to assist with making fitting alterations.  These fitting lines help you to make size and fitting changes in areas common for most people when using commercial patterns.  Mainly, these adjustments include crotch changes and lengthen or shorten lines.  The width is done down the side seam in most pants, but in this pattern, you would just increase the back crotch width or the front accordingly.  

I like this pattern because, it is balanced enough to allow for stripes to remain horizontal with no skewing like what happens with regular leggings.  This is because the inseam (inside leg seam) is straightened, thus causes the pant leg to hang straight on the grain.  


Pattern Details:  
  • Cut size 16 with a waist size 14.
  • lengthened 3 inches to achieve the large hem
  • I used a 1.5″ flat elastic, and installed it like a sportswear waistband with 3 rows of stitching

Fabric Details:  A nice beefy cotton jersey knit purchased in New York.  (New Yorkers are so lucky.)  This fabric has a 32″ repeat…why do I do that to myself!??  The matching striped was begging to be purchased at the same time, although I just can’t seem to pull together a good look for it just yet.  I tried a making top from the small stripe, but it just did not work.  My instagram friends said, it works for two separate looks, but not together. 

Blouse:  I originally made this blouse (The Graffiti Wrap Top) from the 01/2008 Burda Style magazine here.  I just decided not to place the sleeves on this version, and folded over the sleeve opening’s and stitched using a zigzag.  I can see the underlay pulls at the armhole giving it a really cute angle detail at the armhole.  Later I will try and figure out the problem, but for now, I kinda like the look.   I used a matte jersey to make the top, its really nice and cool even in this weather.

All-in-all, I am working on so many different looks right now…so getting back to another top from the same pattern within months of each other must mean I really must like it.  As for the pants, I will be pulling together another pair to wear with a cute tunic I’m working on currently.

THIS IS SPARTA!!!

I dare you come to my home, take up my space, refuse to submit to my will, and manipulate my senses. You have the nerve to present your silken embossed face to me, carrying the seersucker’s banner of his calendared forces waving your stripes and feathers before me, while your forces are lined up six stripes and thirty-two inches deep– all the while laughing at the sheer gesture of my pleading for your submission beneath my needle.

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit

“This is my domain!! This is Sew-To-Fit, and I shall have the last laugh!!!  

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit

In this corner we have Andrea of Sew-To-Fit, using weapons of mass construction known only to fellow Spartan Sewcialites, and an arsenal of ammunition along with Newlook 6303 the Pattern of the day. Fighting with her, is a team of notions supporting her in this battle of wills and backing her every cut and stitch.

Over in the other corner, we have a seersucker impostor, a Silk embossed fabric foe which has the armor of a calendared finish giving it the appearance of a cotton picking seersucker.  The fabric could not be ironed hard…it could only be pressed ever so gently in order to avoid pressing out the nice little squares in the design of the fabric. I was aiming to win that war!

Battle and Constructions Notes:::

Alterations and design changes–

  • cut size 14
  • Lengthened the sleeves 2.5 inches.
  • 1 1/2″ FBA via Pivot & Slide method.
  • Add 3/8″ seam inside back and cut on bias to make the design lines continue from the front and disappear off the back hem.

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit

I cut only the right sleeve on the bias to get the stripe to go in the same direction as that of the front and back, making it a continuous stream.  In doing so I used most of my fabric and was not able to have both sides of the back on the bias.  I made sure to match the sleeve so the lines would meet at the notch point of the front and continue down around the sleeve to meet the lines on the back.

I tried to put the other sleeve only on white but I did not have enough room– I tried several layouts to determine the best look.  The second layout for the sleeve is to just allow the lower half or the lower 4 inches of the sleeve to have a horizontal stripe forming a band at the hem. I think I like this one better.

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit- constructions details

Blocking the pattern pieces when on the bias is important to maintain the size and shape of each section before stitching them together.  In order to keep the shapes the right size and stabilize each pattern piece, I used Design Plus Super Fine Bias fusible stay tape to support the edges after spraying Perfect Sew wash away fabric stabilizer on the fabric.  (I purchased the Design Plus from Lyla Messinger during an American Sewing Guild class.  As a Palmer/Pletsch Instructor, I get the Perfect Sew at wholesale, but you can find it on their website, here.) (Non-sponsored)

I blocked each piece against the pattern piece each time I moved it to a different position, by lightly taping and shifting the fabric back into place with the pattern as a guide, all the while making sure the edges matched up to the original pattern paper.

Cutting on the bias was more trial and error than science.

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit- constructions details

Constructions steps were changed up a little in order to allow for the side seams to be completely finished with no raw/serged edges.  (See photo.)

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit

The back right was also cut on the bias in order to have just a small section of the stripes finish off the tail of the back hem. Doing this meant I had to sacrifice the left back side and cut it straight to avoid having stripes run through that hem. I knew going into the process I would have a problem matching a bias seam to a straight seam which would cause some drag, yet I was willing to live with this problem. I’m really happy that I took the chance, because the positioning of the stripes are really nice.

Asymmetric white silk blouse by sewtofit

As it turns out, this top is really a terrific addition to my wardrobe.  At first I wasn’t feeling this design because of the extra fabric in the front–it is double over.  I would suggest you make sure to use a really lightweight fabric, or else it may be too heavy since the entire front is two layers.

Meet Issy, a StyleArc pattern, straight in from Austrailia.  When I first saw the description and artist rendering for this top, I wanted it right away, knowing that I would feel great wearing such a stylish top.  The drape and shaping on the model revealed such easy flowing drape around the front of the waist, and the cowl neckline hung slimmingly past the bust, creating such a beautiful asymmetric fall from the shoulders.  

I was in love with this top, and was sure I would stand in the same pose and walk with the same swag exhibited in the pattern illustration.

Initially when I began cutting and sewing this lovely top, I concluded during the first fitting, that this may very well not be a match made in sewing heaven.  What went wrong?  Was it my shape, was it the fabric, was the design wrong for me?  Since I couldn’t come to a conclusion as to the problem, I stored this beauty away in the UFO pile/box.

That was three months ago!!  Now, after clearing, cleaning, and organizing, I revisited the Issy Knit Top by StyleArc.  Should this be considered the age ole:  “I just needed some space.” sort of relationship?  Because now, I am in love again.  I don’t know about you, but maybe it was the time we spent away from each other, because now I can honestly say I am very happy with this top. 

So, I guess the answers to my prior questions three months ago, would be: The design is terrific for your body type, the fabric is a good choice, especially for this Houston weather, and no, nothing went wrong!  “It was your mood missy, Issy is just right for you!”

With that being said, I have personally come to the conclusion to now follow a few simple precepts when I have reached the breaking point in my workroom while dealing with a difficult issue regarding my sewing projects. 

This is an old pic, the shelves are filled now.

First, do not trash the project completely, because whatever you are wrestling with currently regarding your fashion image, may not hold true after a little quiet time, or personal space away from your situation.  Secondly, DO NOT trust your mirror, IT LIES, use the camera instead!!  Pictures are worth the effort..

What is it about the camera lens in helping us to see things for what truly shows through, where the mirror fails? Third, trust your prior RTW (ready-to-wear) purchases, they are a good indicator of what you love about your personal fashion sense and style. 

After all this drama, I will be adding this top to my closet finally, and placing the pattern high in my pattern rotation.  Next will be the long sleeve for the winter, and a sleeveless to wear with jackets. 

The softness of the cotton jersey is cozy, one of many great fabric pieces I bought while in Austin at the PR Weekend back in May.  (BTW, that was the best sewing trip for me in years!!) 

Based on the StyleArc sizing chart I made a size 14, and it fit like this straight out of the package.  WOW!!! Now, that is terrific.  Design exceptions include:

  • 3/4” swayback adjustment before cutting,
  • pleats instead of gathers for the front ruching

Personally, I did not like the amount of ease created at the waist from the ruching/gathers, so instead I pleated my fronts in those areas.  this pattern is spot on for my frame.  The shoulder seams are right on point. 

I have a problem with the shape of the back hem, and I know it falls like that on the back because I should have added some width around the hip.  (Next time.)  I am really happy with this top because it may very well take the place of my more common t-shirts, that I wear often.

Tell me something, just between you and me.  Have you ever tossed out a project after the first fitting because you didn’t think it would work for you??  Or, am I the only one?  

Often times I have to get out of my box of simple style and symmetrical silhouettes.  It seems that when a garment is not even or symmetrical on both sides for me, I have a hard time feeling comfortable.  Another, fashion trend that is new for me is to use large print graphics.  However, after reading my regular blog roll, I was so inspired by the top Cennetta over at Mahogany Stylist shared with us.  Graphic prints!  Ok, I might be able to do this.

 Graphic Tee- sewtofit.com

I found what I was looking for when I came upon the stash that Natasha at Sew Crafty Chemist shared.  This top was a true inspiration item, brought on as I continued to scour the net looking for ideas for a garment I would be comfortable with, and a graphic print fabric which I could get excited about and actually be able to wear considering my tendency towards humdrum prints and solids.

Sew Crafty shared this print she had gotten via mail order.  I wanted that print, but I hate mail order fabrics, I like to “touch” the fabrics I purchase.  Is anyone else like that?  However, SMFabrics Online store is here in Houston, so when I have the urge to touch, I can set an appointment to visit the warehouse.  The best of both worlds.

I found this particular fabric at Fabric Depot, while on a trip in July.  I couldn’t wait to get back home to sew up something, anything!  But, I had to lay this fabric out and admire its graphic, and allow it to “speak” to me and tell me what it wanted to become.

It just seemed right, to use McCalls 6797, like a match made in fabric heaven.   My fabrics speak to me all the time, however, sometimes I just don’t listen and end up with duds. Wouldn’t you say your fabrics talk to you?

Pattern Details/Review:

M6797

Line Art
Not much to it.  Pullover tops (loose-fitting through bust) have neck band, front/back extending into right sleeve forming drape, shaped hemline and narrow hem. A: armhole band.

Let’s talk about the sleeve and armhole- The sleeveless side is GREAT!  I love the way it hugs the body and curves right in under the arm.  Now the other side, not so much.  It just showed too much when the arm is raised. So here, I sewed up the edge about 6″inches, thus, creating a type of pocket under the arm.  Problem solved. 

No alterations were made, although a 1″ FBA would have been useful in order to avoid crawling of the front towards the sleeved side.  I should have also widened the bottom opening a little so it would drape more freely over my hips.  I cut a straight Medium.

I tried it with the sleeve as well, but I wasn’t happy.

The final verdict…I will definitely make another.  Just have to wait for another “wow” fabric.

Sew, until next time….
Andrea